SMS Provides Fashion Freedom For Consumers, Designers

Iran is a country where opposites pull each other as far as possible without (yet) reaching the breaking point. On one hand, extremely conservative clerics officially rule society. On the other, young adults–particularly university-educated female ones–long to be part of the modern world, even if it goes against religion-based mores.

Thus, the symbiotic relationship between text messaging and fashion was born.

This month’s issue of Marie Claire has a short piece on fashion shows in Iran. While it’s OK in Iran to have events touting fashions that adhere to religious dress codes, it is not OK to stage productions featuring outfits that are too tight, show too much flesh, and include male as well as female spectators. Indeed, a woman can be arrested for wearing cropped pants, the magazine says.

So designers have taken to creating guerrilla fashion shows. These are planned months in advance, take place in obscure locations like parking garages or private basements–and are not announced until just a few hours beforehand, via text message.

What a perfect example of using SMS to send urgent information. Not only do these surprise texts give people the information they want as soon as possible, wherever the person happens to be; they are also imbued with a special cache, making recipients feel like they are in an exclusive club that doesn’t play by the rules.

That sense of daring could be applied to other types of events, even if there is no threat of punishment looming overhead. Secret concerts by favorite musicians. First-look movie or stage premieres. Special sales to which only text message-subscribers are privy.

Los Angeles’ fall collections debuted last week. Though I love fashion and consider myself an amateur stylist, I didn’t really care. Maybe I’m jaded by the plethora of designer items that are mass-made and for sale at every mall. If I’d gotten a secret text message about the shows, I might have been almost as titillated as the fashionistas in Iran.

Eydie Cubarrubia, Marketing Communications Manager, mobileStorm

“I’d rather you text me”

 

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